Zambia to South Africa

I’m a photographer. I see the world in highlights and shadows, composition and shape. Sometimes I don’t want to be ‘framing’ my world within the contours of a viewfinder, but I do. It’s not a burden, but a gift. Being in Zambia, the world around me has changed. I feel a bit like a kid in a candy store with all the new and wonderful treasures there is to capture; the people especially. We have journeyed with the beautiful people of Zambia for about 5 months. We have learned a bit of their language, their culture, and their faith. We have seen the hardships they face and we have seen God move in beautiful ways. It has been my pleasure to freeze them in my camera. To freeze the moments of time we have spent with them, and to freeze their burdens and trials into a means of raising awareness and connecting worlds. That’s my hope and my prayer.

documentary photography Zambia Africa

zambia and south africa photographer

On a personal note: For those of you who don’t already know, Nick and I will be spending the next few months in Cape Town, South Africa as we go through the CPx training and schooling with All Nations (the parent organization to Love’s Door). We are excited to be back in South Africa, in a town we love and with people we cherish, but will deeply miss, for this short time, the people of Zambia, the villagers we shared life with, and the opportunities to serve with them… but this is only the beginning for us….

Prayer points: For those of you who are continually praying for us and showing us support and encouragement, Thank you! We are forever grateful! A few things we are praying about and hope you can join in are: A mode of transportation. We are thinking about getting a little scooter to get around Cape Town during our schooling and are praying for the funds to come in. We are also prayerful about the outreach phase of this schooling, as we want to be and go where we are supposed to be. There is so much need and so many people to shine light to, but want to be in His perfect will.

Queen

documentary photographer zambia africa widow

african photography poverty widow village

Queen, a recent widow and newfound friend of mine: at first impression, she is seemingly shy and reserved. Take another look and you’ll find she is spunky and a fighter. She wears the scarf of one who has lost her husband. She is grieving. He was the sole provider of their family; now leaving her the sole provider of her eight grandchildren. She is burdened. Zambian law gives rights to her husband’s family, not including his widow. She is being told that their land is no longer hers, because it belongs to his family. She is alone.

I would like to say we have easy answers and a quick fix for Queen. We don’t. The issues that Queen is up against are complicated, cultural, and multi-dimensional, and if we want to help create an atmosphere of empowerment for Queen, more and more, we are finding that being encouragers and a support is where our role should be. It’s hard. It’s messy.

I am reminded of a song that Dan wrote… (Abridged version)

Take my love to the Nations…
Show them I care…
Show them I’m there

Take my light to the dark places of this world
Show them I care…
Show them I’m there

Watch their faces turn bright when they turn on that light
And they see that I care
and they know that I’m there

Take my healing to the broken hearted orphan child
Show him I’m there
Show her I care

In her darkest night
I will work for her with all my might
Show her I’m there
Show him I care

Cause if you don’t go
How then will they know?
That I still care
That I’m really

You’re my hands and my feet
You’re my message to this world
To show them I’m there
To show them I care

We ask for prayer and wisdom in finding ways to partner with Queen and her family… for provision and long-term solutions to take care of her and her grandchildren.

zambia photographer rural village documentary

Children of Zambia

“…if you spend yourself on behalf of the hungry, and satisfy the needs of the oppressed, then your light will rise in the darkness, and your night will become like the noonday.” Isaiah 58:10

With the demeanor of a meak and quiet spirit, with just wispers in his voice, Oliver sits beside me as I teach him English colors and read him some Bible stories. At age 9, Oliver (shown directly below), has been identified as a vulnerable child here in the villages. He and his younger sister, Monde, were both found with no food, in a home with no roof, in a village where they were unwanted. Even by their own mother. Love’s Door for All Nations, the organization we serve with, gladly welcomed them into their Children’s Home with a caring widow, named Hilda who has taken them in amongst her own children. He now has food, shelter, clothing, and school fees, but most importantly, a chance at life, and hope.

Oliver, Vulnerable Children, Singanga Zambia, Documentary Photography

Mud House, Siandavu Village Zambia, Documentary Photography

Village Kids, Siandavu Village Zambia, Documentary Photographer Africa

Child playing in dirt, Smiling Boy, Siandavu Village, Zambia, Africa

World Change is How We Roll

World Change is How I Roll….

I received this slogan on a sticker from a company called Sevenly after purchasing a t-shirt that donates funds to people in need of clean water.

I loved the sticker almost as much as the shirt.

How cool would this world be if everyone lived by that little catchy phrase? World Change.

What does it even mean? How can we even do this?

For some people, maybe they can’t go to far off distant lands and work with the poor and broken. Maybe some don’t even want to. Maybe others don’t have any extra money to give or resources to spare.

We know a man here in Zambia in one of the villages we serve in who is constantly telling us about all the needs we should help with. This woman’s thatch roof is falling down, or this family has no food.

He desperately wants to help, but doesn’t feel like he has anything to give.

So he tells the “white man”, who of course, has all the keys to save the world and all the money in the world to do it. Or maybe that’s what they’ve been told or maybe that’s what they’ve learned. (a different subject entirely)

But instead, I want to challenge our friend in the village to give what he does have.

Compassion, time, a worker’s strong hand, prayer, love.

If we think on these things, we all have SO much to give. Some things are intangible, but equally, if not more, moving to another human.

I offer my hand to help, but also, I offer my heart.

Jesus taught me this. He showed us first what it’s like to lay down our lives for others. I have been moved by this and in turn, want to show this love to others. It’s a start. It’s a goal.

And thus, I offer my two cents and challenge you to go ahead… change the world.